NZ should allow genetically modified food essay

The Formal Writing section on moodle has been expanded. Here is part of an essay on genetically modified food.

New Zealand should allow genetically modified food.

New Zealand should allow genetically modified food. A large portion of the third world relies heavily on genetically modified crops to support rapidly growing populations. Refusing to import these crops, and consequently produced foods, makes it even more difficult for these poorer nations to sustain themselves. Genetically modified foods are also easier to produce, as crops can be made to grow faster or produce more of the desired food. We can also grow crops to contain more of helpful vitamins and minerals, for example, we can produce oranges with higher vitamin C content, as well as being made with a higher resistance to diseases.

In many third world countries the populations are growing rapidly. In order to support this growth, the people of the poorer states turn to genetically modified crops. These crops have been modified to produce more fruit or more food, for example, they can produce 120 tons of wheat using the same size fields and same growth methods that previously produced around 100 tons. Not only that but genetically modified crops can also be made better able to withstand draughts and floods which plague many developing nations. This means that these countries can better cope with such natural disasters. In 2003 in Zambia, genetically modified crops were pulled out of the industries. This was followed by a famine which lasted until they later reintroduced the modified crops. This famine was due to the fact that Zambian farmers were simply unable to produce a big enough crop with the normal, unmodified seed. New Zealand is a large contributor of aid to developing nations, but if we allow genetically modified foods that we will support these nations’ industries, thus making them less dependent on foreign aid.

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