The Lost Generation – Palindrome and Tone

The poem below is called Lost Generation and it’s by Jonathan Reed. Here’s it is:

I am part of a lost generation.
And I refuse to believe that
I can change the world.
I realize this may be a shock, but
“Happiness comes from within”
Is a lie, and
“Money will make me happy”
So in thirty years, I will tell my children
They are not the most important thing in my life.
My employer will know that
I have my priorities straight because
Work
Is more important than
Family
I tell you this:
Once upon a time
Families stayed together
But this will not be true in my era.
This is a quick fix society
Experts tell me
Thirty years from now, I will be celebrating the tenth anniversary of my divorce.
I do not concede that
I will live in a country of my own making.
In the future,
Environmental destruction will be the norm.
No longer can it be said that
My peers and I care about this Earth.
It will be evident that
My generation is apathetic and lethargic.
It is foolish to presume that
There is hope.

And all of this will come true unless we reverse it.

Lost Generation is a palindrome poem. The inspiration for this poem came from an Argentinian political advertisement, ‘The Truth’ by RECREAR.

Many teachers use The Lost Generation to teach tone.

Tone, in written composition, is an attitude of a writer toward a subject or an audience. Tone is generally conveyed through the choice of words or the viewpoint of a writer on a particular subject.

Every written piece comprises a central theme or subject matter. The manner in which a writer approaches this theme and subject is the tone. The tone can be formal, informal, serious, comic, sarcastic, sad, and cheerful or it may be any other existing attitudes. Consider the following examples of tone:

The theme of both tone examples is the same. The only way we can differentiate between them is their separate tone. The tone in the first example is casual or informal while, it is more formal in the second.

 

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Leonardo DiCaprio Addresses UN Climate Summit: ‘You Can Make History… Or Be Vilified By It’

This video is the one that I talked about in class. Please view.

The Huffington Post introduced the video like this:

Leonardo DiCaprio addressed world leaders assembled for the United Nations Climate Summit early Tuesday morning, urging them to take action to address “the greatest challenge of our existence on this planet.”

“As an actor, I pretend for a living. I play fictitious characters often solving fictitious problems. I believe humankind has looked at climate change in that same way,” he said at the summit. “My friends, this body — perhaps more than any other gathering in human history — now faces that difficult task. You can make history… or be vilified by it.”

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon recently appointed DiCaprio to serve as a United Nations Messenger of Peace, calling the actor a “new voice for climate advocacy.” Both Ban and DiCaprio participated in Sunday’s 400,000-strong People’s Climate March in New York City.

Read more here.

Panyee FC

This short film was made to inspire people to start thinking differently. The hope is that they will start to make the difference to their own world. It doesn’t have to be big, but a little can create positive changes.

The film is based on a true story. In 1986 a football team that lived on a little island in the south of Thailand called “Koh Panyee”. It’s a floating village in the middle of the sea that has not an inch of soil. The kids here loved to watch football but had nowhere to play or practice. But they didn’t let that stop them. They challenged the norm and have become a great inspiration for new generations on the island.

The film fits with our ‘Identity and Belonging’ study and our Year 8 ‘Friendship’ study.